Tag Archives: compund words

STARTING SENTENCES WITH “AND” AND “BECAUSE”: EXTRACT FROM FACEBOOK LITERARY CLASS PART III

16 Dec

The literary class on facebook has taken off. Literally!


Participants had hardly consumed and digested the intellectually edifying lesson on Prefix, Suffix or compound words, that was so aptly taught by the effervescent Alcia Morgan-Bromfield, before they were face to face with another.

Marlene Gilling was at it again. This time around she needed clarity on the issue of whether it is okay to start a sentence with “Because” or “And”. Can’t say I was surprised because she did warn us it was coming. This is becoming a habit. A very good habit. Who the heck is complaining anyway? There is a popular saying that “where freeness is bliss, it is folly to resist”. We all dug in when Marlene took to facebook and wrote:

“Rosie has been avoiding me all day. Because I told her that what she did to Ray was wrong she has decided not to speak to me. And if she is upset about the truth I’m not apologizing. CeeBarbs plz get the team on board. I need help. The because and the and have me”

The discussion did not get too far before the expert came and set the record straight. Alcia Morgan-Bromfield responded:

“Sentences can be categorized in two main ways: by their function and by their structure. Marlene, your query is concerned with the structure so I will focus on that. Sentences by structure are classified as simple, compound, complex or compound-complex. To help determine the structure of a sentence, one must examine its formation.
One main clause ( simple sentence)
Two simple clauses joined by a coordinating or correlating conjunction ( compound sentence)
Two simple clauses joined by a subordinating conjunction (complex sentence)
Two or more clauses joined by both subordinating and coordinating conjunctions (compound-complex)

Both “because” and “and” fall in the class of conjunctions. Their main function is to join clauses or phrases. “Because” is a subordinating conjunction whereas “and” is a coordinating conjunction. Remember, subordinating conjunctions are used in complex sentences which comprise an independent or main clause and a subordinating or dependent clause. Eg:
“Because I told her that what she did to Ray was wrong (subordinating clause), she has decided not to speak to me (main clause).

If you divide the sentence into two clauses this is what you would get:
(1) Because I told her that what she did to Ray was wrong (subordinating or dependent clause)
(2) She has decided not to speak to me. (independent or main clause)
If the subordinating clause were left on its own, there would have been questions to answer; the thought would not have been complete; hence the reason it needs to be joined to a main clause.

THE POSITION OF THE DEPENDENT CLAUSE IS NOT IMPORTANT as long as it is followed or preceded by a main clause so the sentence could have been written as the foll:
She has decided not to speak to me, because I told her that what she did to Ray was wrong.
On the other hand, the conjunction “and” joins two simple sentences or two main clauses to form a compound sentence.
I am going to wash the dishes and Cee is going to wash the car.
I am going to wash the dishes. (main or independent clause)
(and)
Cee is going to wash the car. (main or independent clause)
Both ideas are complete; there are no questions left unanswered.
In creative writing and speech however, it is a convention of both format that the author’s or character’s stream of consciousness can be shown using any class of word in an unconventional way. Writers and speakers will get away with that as there is the understanding between writer/speaker and audience) that this is permissible and accepted.

AS FAR AS I KNOW, it is not permissible to use a coordinating or correlating conjunction (eg either/or) to function as a subordination conjunction in academic or formal writing as in the example cited in the post “And if she is upset about the truth I’m not apologizing”.
Again, I hope this helps. Please enlighten me if your readings/research show you otherwise.”

It does not get better than this. You agree, right? What I have come to admire and appreciate about the lecturer of these lessons, is her open approach to the subject of discussion. Despite her wealth of knowledge, she does not take it for granted that she is always right. This great show of humility captured in the last line of her response.
By the way, she mentioned in the second lesson that she would charge for the next, BUT…. let’s see how the remuneration package pans out.

Do you have a challenge with the use of ‘Because” and “And”? Share your experience. Even if you’ve never had a challenge with the use of the words, you are welcomed to share your thoughts.